jueves, 21 de septiembre de 2017

Are fractured families income busters? |MercatorNet |September 21, 2017| MercatorNet |

Are fractured families income busters?

|MercatorNet |September 21, 2017MercatorNet |







Are fractured families income busters?

A Canadian report suggests a link that politicians should investigate.
Daniel Proussalidis | Sep 21 2017 | comment 2 



The debate over income inequality and poverty in Canada is a hot topic that has long had the attention of leaders at the highest levels. Even so, the inequality debate in Canada among politicians, policy analysts, the academic community, and the media has largely ignored the role of a monumental social change over the last four decades: increased family fracturing.
A new Cardus study, Missing Family Dynamics, by policy analyst Mark Milke, notes that divorce and separation shot up by 134 percent in Canada between 1971 and 2016. Yet there has been relatively little study of how social and cultural factors affect families, which then in turn affect statistics on poverty and income inequality.
For example, female lone-parent families had median after-tax incomes 52 percent lower than two-parent families in 2011 – only a modest improvement from the 61 percent gap of 1976. And male lone-parent families had median after-tax incomes 39 percent lower than two-parent families in 2011. That’s worse than the 25 percent gap that existed in 1976. In other words, family makeup matters to poverty statistics and potentially to inequality data.
“With the focus in the public debates often only on economic data, the debates on inequality and poverty are unnecessarily limited,” says Milke. “When one family splits into two, there is the potential to increase poverty because two households are typically more expensive to maintain than one.” Another factor in inequality is the rise in unattached individuals – rocketing up by three quarters between 1976 and 2014 to 16% of the population. Unattached individuals, however, have median after-tax incomes almost 70% lower than a two-parent family.
Another factor in inequality is the rise in unattached individuals – rocketing up by three quarters between 1976 and 2014 to 16 percent of the population. Unattached individuals, however, have median after-tax incomes almost 70 percent lower than a two-parent family. 
“It appears the large rise in fractured families and folks living alone could affect inequality in Canada,” says Andrea Mrozek, family program director at think tank Cardus. “Not choosing to acknowledge this and study it further hinders our search for solutions. This is a fertile field for further study by policy makers and academics and with the release of this paper today we are opening up that discussion.”
Missing Family Dynamics recommends that policy-makers and the academic community do the following:
  • Focus thought, study, and analysis on the non-economic causes of family fracturing.
  • Recognize that family fracturing is itself a cause of poverty and can affect inequality statistics.
  • Take policy steps toward family stability, for example, by reducing financial pressures on families.
  • Encourage individuals, religious institutions, non-profits, and other non-government institutions to support families and help those who struggle with poverty or inequality because of family fracturing.
Download a complimentary copy of Missing Family Dynamics.
Daniel Proussalidis is Director of Communications at Cardus, a Canadian think tank.


MercatorNet

September 21, 2017

The race to eliminate unborn children with disabilities is wrong in a very fundamental way, in that it means ending the life of a human being, and an innocent one at that. It harms those responsible morally.

But it also robs them and the community of a special kind of joy, as we can see from today's story about an American high school senior with Down syndrome. Jake Pratt, the manager of his school's football team, is the hero of a viral video showing him scoring a touchdown goal after actually entering a game for once. It was obviously a feel-good moment for everyone present.

Jake's school has clearly given its students some wonderful lessons about achievement and happiness. Good on them!




Carolyn Moynihan
Deputy Editor,
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MERCATORNET | New Media Foundation 
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Are fractured families income busters?

This powerful sideline encounter will warm your heart |MercatorNet |September 21, 2017| MercatorNet |

This powerful sideline encounter will warm your heart



|MercatorNet |September 21, 2017MercatorNet |















This powerful sideline encounter will warm your heart

Football team manager with Down syndrome meets celebrity coach.
Justin Posey | Sep 21 2017 | comment 








Unless you have little to no contact with college sports, you would probably recognize the name of Clemson head football coach Dabo Swinney.
His Clemson Tigers have competed in the College Football Playoff National Championship game the past two seasons and are the defending national champions.
That’s an impressive feat, and it would be easy to focus entirely on Swinney’s accomplishments as a college coach. But that would only give you half the picture.
Enter Jake Pratt.
Jake is a senior at Vestavia Hills High School in Birmingham, Alabama, and is one of approximately 400,000 Americans living with Down syndrome. Over the past several years, he has diligently worked as Vestavia Hills’ football team manager.
Jake had attended countless workouts and practices, but never suited up for a game—that is, until this season.
On Aug. 25, during the final play of a preseason scrimmage against Briarwood Christian School, Jake entered the game. He took the handoff from the quarterback and sprinted the ball 34 yards for a touchdown. The touching moment can be seen in the video below.



Afterward, Jake’s touchdown went viral on social media and was even covered by ESPN. It wasn’t too long after that thrilling finale that Clemson’s Swinney had seen the highlight and invited Jake to attend Clemson’s upcoming football game against the Auburn Tigers.
I’m sure this act of kindness alone thrilled Jake and his entire family, but you have to see what happened when Swinney spotted Jake on the sidelines Sept. 9 at Memorial Stadium pregame to fully get a sense of how touching the event turned out to be.
The smiles on Jake and Swinney’s faces say it all.
As Swinney went into game mode before the two teams took the field, he could’ve easily ignored Jake and kept on with his business. But that’s just not the man Swinney is.
Upon recognizing Jake, he stopped dead in his tracks to spend a few lighthearted moments with him and to personally welcome and thank him for coming to the big game.
In this poignant moment, Swinney reflects the powerful ways one can use his celebrity status for good. But he and Jake teach us even more than that.
We can learn from both men the importance of respect, love of fellow man, kindness, decency, and the worth and dignity of every human life.
Thank you, Coach and Jake, for reminding us all that life is truly beautiful and should be cherished and celebrated.
Justin Posey is the communications manager for the Institute for Economic Freedom and Opportunity and Legal Studies at The Heritage Foundation. Republished from The Daily Signal.




MercatorNet



September 21, 2017



The race to eliminate unborn children with disabilities is wrong in a very fundamental way, in that it means ending the life of a human being, and an innocent one at that. It harms those responsible morally.



But it also robs them and the community of a special kind of joy, as we can see from today's story about an American high school senior with Down syndrome. Jake Pratt, the manager of his school's football team, is the hero of a viral video showing him scoring a touchdown goal after actually entering a game for once. It was obviously a feel-good moment for everyone present.



Jake's school has clearly given its students some wonderful lessons about achievement and happiness. Good on them!








Carolyn Moynihan
Deputy Editor,
MERCATORNET
Post CommentsFind Us on FacebookFollow us on Twitter
Looking under the rock: Equifax’s credit breach

By Karl D. Stephan
Is it time for the big agencies to come under government regulation?

Read the full article
This powerful sideline encounter will warm your heart

By Justin Posey
Football team manager with Down syndrome meets celebrity coach.

Read the full article
What ‘The Bride of Istanbul’ teaches us about the Muslim world

By Luma Simms
Devout, peaceful Muslims need to work with reformists against the jihadist minority.

Read the full article
Are fractured families income busters?

By Daniel Proussalidis
A Canadian report suggests a link that politicians should investigate.

Read the full article
Family is a priority for immigrants

By Jennifer Minicus
A young Vietnamese boy learns the value of hard work and sacrifice.

Read the full article
We are at our best in disaster relief

By Sheila Liaugminas
Nature keeps sending disasters. People keep sending relief

Read the full article
The new confessional state

By J. Budziszewski
Secularism is becoming a religion.

Read the full article
Remembering 1917: the war on religion

By Paul Kengor
Why has this topic received so little attention from scholars?

Read the full article
The business of addiction: how the video gaming industry has learned from casinos

By Joshua Krook
We need to ask about the ethics of making gaming addictive

Read the full article
Another Indian state moves closer to a two-child policy

By Shannon Roberts
Yet, total fertility is below replacement level.

Read the full article




MERCATORNET | New Media Foundation 
Suite 12A, Level 2, 5 George Street, North Strathfied NSW 2137, Australia 



Designed by elleston
This powerful sideline encounter will warm your heart